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Creating Change Through Peaceful Actions

 

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Run for Freedom
June 20th & 21st
Covington KY to Serpent Mound Peebles Ohio

Run for Freedom

 

A little history

In the late 1960's and early 1970's Leonard Peltier began traveling to different Native communities. He spent a lot of time in Washington and Wisconsin and was working as a welder, carpenter, and community counselor for Native people. In the course of his work he became involved with the American Indian Movement (AIM) and eventually joined the Denver Colorado chapter. In Denver, he worked as a community counselor confronting unemployment, alcohol problems and poor housing. He became strongly involved in the spiritual and traditional programs of AIM.

Eventually his AIM involvement would bring him to assist the Oglala Lakota People of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota in the mid 1970's. On Pine Ridge he participated in the planning of community activities, religious ceremonies, programs for self-sufficiency, and improved living conditions. He also helped to organize security for the traditional people who were being targeted for violence by the pro-assimilation tribal chairman and his vigilantes. It was here that the tragic shoot-out of June 26, 1975 occurred, leading to his wrongful conviction. Despite the harsh conditions of imprisonment, Leonard Peltier has continued to lead an active life.

A citizen of the Anishinabe and Lakota Nations Leonard Peltier is a father, a grandfather, an artist, a writer, and an Indigenous rights activist. He has spent more than twenty-seven years in prison for a crime he did not commit. Amnesty International considers him a political prisoner who should be immediately and unconditionally released.

To the international community, the case of Leonard Peltier is a stain on America's Human Rights record. Nelson Mandela, Rigoberta Menchu, the U.N. High Commissioner on Human Rights, the Dalai Lama, the European Parliament, the Kennedy Memorial Center for Human Rights, and Rev. Jesse Jackson are only a few who have called for his freedom. To many Indigenous Peoples, Leonard Peltier is a symbol of the long history of abuse and repression they have endured. The National Congress of American Indians and the Assembly of First Nations, representing the majority of First Nations in the U.S. and Canada, have repeatedly called for Leonard Peltier's freedom.


When & Where

Since 1997 the Run for Freedom has been traveling by foot across the US and Canada spreading the message about the case of Leonard Peltier and other Prisoners of Conscience.

Last year the prison system decided to move Leonard from the federal prison in Leavenworth KS to Lewisburg PA. So we traveled from Covington KY to Lewisburg.

This year we will gather on Saturday June 20th at 8:00am at
Chief Little Turtle Statue in Covington KY and end on June 21st at
Serpent Mound Park

All FootPrints for Peace events are Drug & Alcohol Free.

 


Route Information

June 20th
Greenup St
Take a left on 4th St
Left on York St cross the river on the Taylor Southgate Bridge Take a right on
Pete Rose Way
Bare right on Eastern Ave
Take a left on Delta
Then a right back on to Eastern Ave.
Bare right on Airport Rd.
Left on Wilmer Ave
Cross Beachmont to Wooster Rd.
Wooster Rd turns in to Wooster Pike
Follow Wooster Pike through Mariemont
Once past Mariemont take a right on Newtown road, Newtown road turns in to Church st.
Turn right on route 32
Stay on ST RT 32 until you get to Williamsburg

June 21st
Stay on St Rt 32
Take a left on Rt 73
Follow Rt 73 to Serpent Mound


Groups to check out

Leonard Peltier Defense Committee

School of the Americas Watch

Amnesty International





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